Injector

Injector

Injector’s Kiwis

Based on the principles that went into its Sparrow doors, Injector reports that its new Kiwi doors are performing well.

Kim Hansen

‘It’s a new multi-function door that is based on the same design technology as our new Admiral pelagic model,’ Injector’s Eystein Elttørs said.

‘We can say it’s an updated version of the Sparrow doors, which were in turn a development that combined the qualities of the Stealth F15 pelagic doors and Cobra demersal doors, and like the Sparrow doors, the Kiwi is a higher-aspect door compared to most demersal trawl doors.’

He said that as the Kiwi generates high spreading power, some trawlers that also have pelagic quotas have been able to use the same doors with their pelagic gear, without the need to switch to pelagic doors.

Injector Kiwi doors on board a trawler in New Zealand

‘They are also used in semi-pelagic mode, with both the doors and the trawl either off the bottom or towed wit minimal ground contact,’ he said, commenting that the Kiwi doors can be produced in a much lighter construction than the Sparrow doors for the same surface area.

‘We can do this without compromising quality or strength. We saw that the Sparrows were sometimes too heavy for trawlers that did not have the power to tow or haul such heavy doors.’

Several sets of Kiwi doors have already been sold to New Zealand, and Injector’s agent there reports that one of their customers fishing with a 3m2 pair of Kiwis completed three capacity trips, and still had fuel left for two more.

‘This is unheard of and the owner was over the moon,’ Eystein Elttør said.

‘We have also put a pair of 6m2 Kiwi doors on board Icelandic trawler Ljósafell and both skippers have been happy with the results, reporting that the doors are stable and maintain their balance, and they have been able to use them at all depths with the same bridles, which is unusual.’

Ljósafell has a 6 square metre pair of Kiwi doors

He said that the Kiwi doors have also been supplied elsewhere, frequently to trawlers that have been using Sparrow doors for some years, but it’s too early to say to much.

‘We are about to supply a pair of 14m2 Kiwi doors to a Greenlandic shrimp trawler that is currently using Sparrow doors, and this gives us a good opportunity to compare both of these Injector models. This trawler and its skippers were the ones who initially tested the Sparrow doors for us in Greenland, before they became a success around the world,’ Eystein Elttør said.

Kiwi doors sold to vessels so far have replaced doors from other suppliers. This is always good, but for us to be able to compare a new Injector type with a Injector existing model is better. If the Kiwi can outperform Sparrow on the main five factors that makes the Sparrow so good, then we will have a winner.’